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Wednesday, August 29th, 2012 | Author: Casey Criswell

As I’ve mentioned, I’ve often shied away from reading book series consecutively. I tend to get burnt out a bit if I push on too soon. I read the first book in Kadrey’s series “Sandman Slim” in the middle of last year and I loved it; I was worried about getting too much James Stark at once though. Finally, I felt I had put enough distance between myself & Mr. Stark since the last time and picked up “Kill the Dead”.

James Stark, the “Sandman Slim” of the series title is a badass bundle of hoodoo and raw muscle. He has quite a bit of attitude and self deprecating humor as well as a tendency to feel sorry for himself. Considering he spent the past eleven years in hell though, it’s okay. In Book 1 of the series, we watched as Stark clawed his way out of hell and went in search of revenge on the person that sent him ‘downtown’ in the first place. With those adventures behind him, we join Stark as he hunts down a rogue vampire, on a mission from Gold Vigil also known as ‘Heaven’s Special Task Force’. At first glance, you look at the title “Kill The Dead” and this first scene with a vampire and you figure you know where this story is going to go. Author Richard Kadrey is a cagey bugger though and it certainly doesn’t pan out as one would predict which is what makes this a lot of fun.

“Kill the Dead” treads a lot of familiar genre ground. There are vampires and zombies, but they’re different; especially on the zombie front. I was worried when they first showed up as zombie novels don’t do a whole lot for me these days. Kadrey mixes it up though. He gives us zombies that are a bit harder to kill, varying strengths and powers and a whole lot more drive behind them. It’s a nice change up. They’re also not the driving force of the book either. While they are a big part, there are a whole lot of other things going on at the same time in this version of LA. Stark has to work with a lot of different people and chase down a few sub plots, so it’s not all, “watch the survivors fight to the rebuilding of America”. In, this isn’t even a ‘zombie apocalypse’ situation. There’s just a zombie problem that needs cleared up!

The highlight of the “Sandman Slim” novels is the characters. Some are one dimensional, but they’re written well so that one dimension is pretty fun. Start is full of wise cracks and his side kick, that of a schlub of a man’s severed head…., are pretty entertaining. Mix in Stark’s dealings with various angels, covert organizations from Heaven, even Lucifer himself and you see a complete and well thought out world laid out in efficient manner. Topping it off, Kadrey’s writing style flows well and seldom feels like it is bogged down. It’s full of snark and one liners, with a purpose mind you, and makes for fun engaging reading.

The beauty is, fun and engaging is all I really ask for when reading genre fiction, so “Kill the Dead” hits the spot quite nicely!

I gave “Kill the Dead” 4 stars out of 5 over on Goodreads!


Looking for a book podcast? Be sure to check out my genre fiction cast, The Dad and his Weird Friends Book Club over at Bloody Good Horror! What to compare books with me? Come add me on Goodreads! Want to discuss books? Come join us in the Dad and his Weird Friends Book Club on Facebook!

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Friday, August 17th, 2012 | Author: Casey Criswell

I love hard science fiction when i can vaguely understand it. I am nowhere near smart enough to understand astrophysics and the like, but I’m smart enough to keep and intuit some ideas. The idea of the cosmos fascinates me as well. Not knowing what is out there, (come on there has to be SOMETHING!) the limits of our technology throwing us further and further into the depths…good far out there hard science fiction is truly amongst my favorite genres to read. Especially when they connect it to our own human timeline, regardless of how far-future and tenuous that line happens to be! With that in mind, the first book Stephen Baxter’s “Xeelee” saga was pretty damn fascinating.

The idea of alien life always entertaining me, especially when that life is REALLY alien. For example, “Blindsight” by Peter Watts plays with the idea that alien life forms may take aspects that are completely new to us. The spectrum of light that the creatures see, their physical make up, the way they think; something completely off the beaten path from any theory that our own alien biologists could ever conceive. I’ve always been a firm believe that any alien life form we do encounter; it’s not going to be anything like life as we know it. So seeing some crazy ideas come to life in a novel is good fun for me. Baxter plays with these concepts quite well in “Raft”, though his creatures are still tangentially related to our earth bound life forms. He has flying trees! Yes, it’s spectacular that they fly! They’re still wood though. He has crazy space whales! They’re still pretty much like our whales when you get down to the nitty-gritty of the creatures makeup. They’re out there enough that they fit well into my ideas of fascinating life forms.

To branch off from that train of thought, one of my reading quirks is that seldom ever read a series of books in succession. Sure, I love the stories but if I read all the books in a series back to back, I start to feel bogged down and become a bit bored. It’s something I’ve always done and sometimes it might be a full year before I circle back to the second book. To wrap this back to the above alien life thought, Baxter stays in fairly familiar territory as far as life forms go throughout “Raft”. At the very end however, he changes things up a great way! It’s great enough that it leaves me thing, “I may have to go ahead and read book 2 just to see what this is all about!” For me, that’s a pretty strong sign. The best part is, the alien stuff? It’s not even the biggest concepts at play in “Raft”. Baxter has created a universe so far flung from our own that at times it’s hard to wrap your head around. The forces of gravity at play are magnitudes stronger than our own. Couple this with the fact that our characters live in a nebula and things get even weirder! His concepts seem fairly smart as well, to one such as myself that is again…not any kind of physicist.

While I enjoyed the hell out of “Raft”, I ultimately gave this one a 4 out of 5, and the reasons lie mostly in the characters and the small political sub-plot that runs the length of the book. While the characters are not bad by any means, most of our side characters outside of Rees are fairly one dimensional. We do get to connect to Rees and root for him throughout, the majority of the other characters feel like set pieces. While that does sound a bit harsh, I just didn’t connect to them much. The political sub-plot felt a bit forced as well, with three locations and three factions all spatting with each other. While I realize the need for this particular thread, it just didn’t come across to well for me. In the width of this fantastic book, it was these political moments that felt sluggish and the only moments that made me wish they’d hurry up and get it over with.

So in the end? I still REALLY LOVE SCIENCE FICTION! I’m also REALLY GLAD I READ THIS BOOK! I am really stoked to move on read more of Baxter’s “Xeelee” sequence and I have quite a bit of hope for the rest of the series. Taking a peak at the other books, things sound pretty sweet indeed.

EDIT: Aww, damn! Further research shows that “Raft” is a stand alone novel! Boo!

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Tuesday, August 14th, 2012 | Author: Casey Criswell

One of my favorite past times…well, beyond reading…is to make lists. I love making lists! This little hobby works well with my reading as it allows me to have my little ‘trophy’ after completing a book. Sure, I don’t *need* a trophy for completing a book, but in the days of my paperback addiction, this trophy was a new title added to the book shelf. Since I’ve put those ways behind me and sold my soul to the Kindle gods, I don’t have that little mental satisfaction. Until I stated keeping track of how many books I read in a year is. Now, I see the number go up and I get a brief sensation of smug satisfaction…then it’s on to the next book.

Less dusting, less clutter, more books. I think it’s a win-win over all.

I’ve been trucking along fairly slowly for 2012; I set a goal of knocking out 50 books this year, but I’m a bit behind schedule. It’s okay though. It’s not a contest and there’s no real prize and I still get to read a crap load of good books. Still; behind where I thought I’d be. Winter is coming though, as that Martin guy says, so I know the reading will increase greatly when I’m inside more often. Normally, I keep track of my books read on Goodreads profile, but I figured since I opened this here blog up, I’ll start here as well. (Note: Feel free to add me on Goodreads if you haven’t!)

So, here we are at book #22 for 2012; Laird Barron’s “The Croning”! I stumbled across Barron on one of my forums reading up about the ‘cosmic horror’ genre. You see, I’m woefully under read on the Lovecraft mythos. I’ve read quite a bit and enjoyed it; I’ve not ventured out into the worlds of other authors that dip their toes into Lovecraft’s world however. Barron came highly recommended in the world of cosmic horror but until recently, he was mostly a short story writer. I started off my introduction to Barron’s world with “Occultation and other Stories” and I was hooked pretty quickly. Seeing as “The Croning” was Barron’s first full length novel and receiving quite a bit of praise from other fans of his short stories, I was pretty eager to get to this one. By the end, I was quite happy that I skipped it to the top of the to-read pile!

As with many cosmic horror stories, “The Croning” is a slow burn. It’s not horror that is going to jump out and slap you in the face with your own severed arm; it’s horror that’s going to seep into your joins and give you chills, make you run from the dark living room when you turn off the lights for the night. The novel is not fast paced by any means and you will be hit with a deluge of detail from the get go. Barron spends quite a bit of time setting up atmosphere and character development throughout much of the book. We get to know Don Miller in exquisite detail by the end of this novel, but it all pays off eventually. While this makes for a fantastic story in the end, it can definitely be a bit of a hurdle to get started. You trudge along wondering where the weird stuff comes in and you start to wonder if you’ve made a mistake. Luckily Barron sprinkles in minor touches throughout that make you sit back and wonder, “What the hell?” and then forces you to keep reading to see if he’s going to reveal the impetus behind that moment.

Adding to some of this confusion is the fact that our main narrative jumps around quite a bit in the time stream. We go from the 1980′s to current time, back to the mid-50′s and them sometimes back to the 80′s again. Like I said; in hindsight you see why this was done and it makes perfect sense. While reading the first time, it can be a bit confusing. If I had one complaint for “The Croning”, I would say that at times Barron makes the Don Miller of different eras quite similar to each other. This makes the jump in time a bit confusing. Sure, he labels the beginning of each chapter with what time period we’re diving into, but when you’re caught up in the story and blazing through pages at a pretty good clip, this can often get overlooked. Again, this was always solved with back tracking a couple pages so when I say ‘complaint’, what I really mean is ‘minor annoyance’!

The ending of “The Croning” is where our grand payoff is and the payoff is quite splendid. If you have spent the first 2/3′s of the book wondering, “When is this going to get weird?” It definitely gets weird. It gets weird in a really good way as well. Of course, I’m not going to bother to give you any details because that would take the fun out of it. You can trust me though and consider this one definitely worth your time.

If you’d like to learn more about Laird Barron, you can find him over on Livejournal and you can find a list of his books over at Goodreads as well. He doesn’t appear to have an ‘official’ website outside of Livejournal however.

Coming up soon, Carly will be joining me on the Dad and his Weird Friends Book Club to discuss The Croning and from what I’ve seen on Twitter, she’s getting into it as well. Should be a great show! We’ll definitely go much more in depth than I have here, so be sure to watch for that!

Friday, August 10th, 2012 | Author: Casey Criswell

We’re back once again over here at the Weird Friends podcast with a whole new episode! This time around, we go with some fairly light horror fare with Chuck Wendig’s “Double Dead”!

This book was a pleasant surprise for myself. I have a good friend that I’ve traded books back and forth with for years. Said friend, Ak, hit me up awhile back with an article on Chuck Wending stating that he had been hearing quite a bit of buzz on him and the plots of his existing books grabbed me fairly quick! I’ve read a lot of zombie novels here as of late and while I do enjoy them, they tend to get a bit too heavy and in some cases, a bit too repetitive. Wendig’s version of the undead apocalypse was a nice change of pace that moved quick and wasn’t too heavy with ennui, melancholy, and stoic rambling.

Wending has some other books that look really good too, Blackbirds and Mockingbird. Both of these have catapulted up to the top of my to-read pile after reading “Double Dead”, so should be cool!

As always, the Dad and his Weird Friends show can be found on Bloody Good Horror Feed and iTunes! Give us a listen, let us know what you think! Feedback is welcome and encouraged, send your missives to casey@bloodygoodhorror.com!

Finally, come join us in the Dad and his Weird Friends Book Club on Facebook! We like to talk about books and if that’s your thing, we’d love to have you with us. It’s been a bit slow here lately, but that’s because we don’t have you there to help spice things up!

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Wednesday, July 11th, 2012 | Author: Casey Criswell

It was slow there for a bit, but I’m now getting back into the podcasting groove here at Fromage central and you know what? It feels good. My guest this episode, Colleen, the First Lady of Fright, will tell you that I still read slow as all hell, but that’s okay!

If you haven’t been able to tell after these last two episodes, the Criswell household is a well read household. The trick is, Colleen and I’s taste in genre fiction doesn’t always meet up eye to eye. I love me some hard core sci-fi, Coll likes urban fantasy and paranormal romance type stuff. The beauty is that when it comes to horror and zombies especially, we tend to see eye to eye. In addition to this, Colleen and I have been a pair for nearly twenty years now. (I know, right?) She knows me *quite* well. In fact, she knows me better than anybody else out there. So when Coll finishes a book and immediately turns to me and says, “OH MY GOD you gotta read this!!!” I tend to take notice, and it generally pays off in my favor!

Which leads us to Episode 12. Coll was very excited by this book and it was brought to her attention by a simple recommendation on Goodreads. (You can follow Colleen on Goodreads here!) It just goes to show that Goodreads is a handy resource! If you like zombies and good characters, this one’s definitely worth checking out.

As always, feedback on the podcast is always welcome! Shoot me an email at Casey@bloodygoodhorror.com, anytime! We have a discussion groupon Facebook as well, so come join us and geek out on some books!

The Dad and his Weird Friends Book Club can be found on the Bloody Good Horror Podcast Feed or you can download directly, here!

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Friday, June 22nd, 2012 | Author: Casey Criswell

Man, one moment it’s June 5th and I’m blogging away, then I step away for a moment and June’s almost over! Bad blogger Casey, BAD BLOGGER!

Anywho…

Though June’s gone by in a blur, but things have been going on in the background. The Dad and his Weird Friends Podcast had gone silent for a month or two, but we recently started polluting your airwaves once again with Episode 11 where my lovely wife joins me to talk about Ransom Rigg’s “Miss Peregrines Home for Peculiar Children!”

In the past week, this next round of episodes has started to take shape as the list of books and guests has been coming together pretty quick! It’s shaping up to be a good one with a good mix of books and a great mix of guests.

Here’s what you can expect so far, in no particular order:

The Long Earth by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter with Mike Chiseck

Redshirts by John Scalzi with That Ghoul Eva

Emperor Mollusk Vs. The Sinister Brain by A. Lee Martinez with John Shelton

Blue Remembered Earth by Alastair Reynolds with Jon Schnaars

The Croning by Laird Barron with Carly

Nocturnal by Scott Sigler with Andy Helmkamp

Crooked Little Vein by Warren Ellis with Bryan White

Hemlock Grove by Brian McCreevy with Sebastian O’Brian

Double Dead by Chuck Wendig with Joe Charnews

The Cold Dish: A Walt Longmire Mystery by Craig Johnson with Amy from NotLP!

As you can see, we have a pretty varied list! Hopefully, you’ll see something that trips your trigger!

The guests and books are still trickling in too, so the list is only going to get bigger. Be sure to stayed tuned for more updates as they come! While you’re at it, come join us in the Dad and his Weird Friends Book Club over on Facebook and come chat about books!

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Tuesday, April 17th, 2012 | Author: Casey Criswell

It’s been a bit since the last episode, but a new episode of the Dad and his Weird Friends Book Club is here! This time around, friend & co-hort Mark Newell returns to talk about some epic fantasy, namely in the form of Seven Princes, the the debut novel from John R. Fultz.

Also in this episode, I dive into a bit of the catalog from Orbit Books, an imprint here in that states that is quickly becoming a go to source for some quality genre fiction. Among these are some series that I’ve been meaning to sink my teeth into such as Ian Banks’ “Culture” series or Mira Grant’s “Feed” series plus a lot of other series that I think would appeal to a lot of you listeners!

So thanks for listening! I’ve changed up the format this time around just a smidge, hoping that it makes for a bit more of a streamlined listening experience for you all. Feedback is always welcome at casey@bloodygoodhorror.com, so feel free to let me know what you think of it! In addition to that, the Dad and his Weird Friends Book Club on Facebook is going pretty well, some come join us and talk about books!

Finally, I’m looking for more guests to come sit on the shows here in the near future! If you’re a blogger, podcaster, etc and would like to be a Weird Friend? Shoot me an email at casey@bloodygoodhorror.com! I have a list of books that I am looking to cover, but I am open to suggestions as well! So, if you have a book you’ve been dying to read and are looking for an excuse to get it read? Now’s your chance! The only stipulations are that the books are genre related. They don’t have to be new, classics work as well!

Until next time Weird Friends, whatever you do, wherever you go, always take a good book.

-C

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Tuesday, April 10th, 2012 | Author: Casey Criswell

Over at Book Riot today, blogger Rebecca Joines Schinsky wrote a post on her 7 Dirty Little Reading Secrets and it was pretty fun. More importantly…it sounded fun to do, too! Me being as reading obsessed as I have been as of late, it sounded like a perfect idea for a blog post.

So, here you go, my own 7 Little Reading Secrets!

I’ve only read the first two books of the Song of Ice and Fire. I don’t know that I”ll read the rest. I liked the first two books of George R. R. Martin’s “Song of Ice and Fire” series, but there’s just too much of it. I love the TV adaptation too. The detail’s not quite so thick, so it flows a bit better. Whenever I think, “I want to read more Song of Ice and Fire”? I think immediately of a hundred other books that I’m dying to read and may not get to due to the time commitment.

I for one welcome our new Kindle Overlords! I am not saying ‘down with all paper books!’ or anything of that sort. For my library though? I do not lament saying good by to the paper back and welcome the ebook with open arms. I love my Kindle, I love ebooks. It’s changed the way I read, it’s changed the amount I read and it’s made the process even more convenient. It’s not you paperbacks, it’s me. I’ve changed. I do not see myself going back, except for the rare reference book here and there.

I’ve never read a Drizzt Do’urden book. I cut my teeth on Dungeons and Dragons and it was the Weis & Hickman’s “Dragonlance” books that turned me into a fantasy fan. I’ve never read a single page of the Drizzt Do’urden books, though I have probably told a few people I have, just to save face. I love Dark Elves too, which is the crazy thing. I’ve considered going back and reading them here as of late, but I fear they won’t live up to the years of hype. It may not sound like much these days but back in the day; these were must reads.

I’m not a huge horror novel kind of guy. I like horror books in general and I’ve read and loved the one’s you’re supposed to such as King, etc. But, as much as I’ve made my name as a horror blogger, horror podcaster and even a dabbling horror author? I don’t read very much horror. 9 times out of 10? I’m reaching for a science fiction novel followed closely by a fantasy novel. In my own writing attempts, I’ve tried to scribble out some horror stories but I often find myself hitting a road block. Maybe I need to dabble in some other genres!

I read sometimes upwards of 4 books at any given time. I…have an limited attention span at times. SQUIRREL!

Many books tend to bog down in parts, it’s just par for the course. Those chapters that the author has to slow the pacing down to worth through some of the headier ideas of their story. Those chapters that take place between big action sequences and their buildups. I have a hard time with those. Normally I hit a section like that, I sit that book down, move on to another and read until I hit a similar spot. Sometimes, it may be months before I make it back to that first book. It generally only takes me a page or two to remember who’s who and what’s going down once I do pick it up though. For some reason…I don’t do this as much with the Kindle these days.

I’m jealous of my Mom, my old high school friend Corey and my Wife. I read at a pretty decent clip I think. These three? They put me to shame. I spent the old days talking books with Corey. Generally, I’d find a book that blew me away and understandably I’d get pretty excited about it. Normally, when I’d tell Corey about it, the response was, “Oh yah, I read that.” “When?” “Tuesday.” My wife, this lady can put down a book a day given the chance. We recently received a flyer on a local college extension offering speed reading courses. When I asked he if she would want to take it with me, her response was, “What would be the point?”. Finally, my Mom took actual speed reading classes in college. When I was in high school, I would spend months laboring over some boring classic for a book report. She’d read it in two hours so she could help with said report. And the real kicker here? She’s not much of a reader.

The thought of being able to read a book a day still makes me feel giddy just from the sheer amount of cool stuff I could read!

I don’t have a whole lot of interest in ‘The Classics’ By ‘The Classics’, I mean classic literature. I’m all for classic sci-fi and genre books. When it comes to those books that literature classes, high brow lit blogs and everybody else says you ‘need’ to read? Meh. They’re important, yes and many writers wouldn’t be where they are today without these books. They just don’t hold any interest for me. I’ve gone through my share for college classes and the like. That’s enough for me. I know what I like and what I like generally has aliens, space ships, monsters or ray guns in them. I still haven’t read “Pride and Prejudice and Zombies” simply because it’s still in part….”Pride and Prejudice”.

So there you have it, my 7 Dirty Little Reading Secrets. Nothing too blasphemous I think! What are your dirty little secrets? Come share them with us in the Dad and his Weird Friends Book Club on Facebook!

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Thursday, March 22nd, 2012 | Author: Casey Criswell

Man, it’s beautiful in Central Indiana here lately. Summer like, as I’m sure you’ve all heard. With my new found changes in diet and such, I’ve been making an extra effort to get outside more here as of late. Yard work, eating lunch out side, all that good stuff works wonders on the dreary winter disposition. I still loathe yard work, but I’m enjoying the excuse to run around barefoot in the grass, so I can’t really complain that much.

The book in ye olde Kindle there is Michael Cobley’s “The Seeds of Earth”. Not yet available here in the states, I managed to get an ecopy from the UK. It was well worth the footwork to get ahold of it, because this book is a pretty fantastic space opera. You can read more about the book over at the author’s official site. It’s full of crazy alien races, colonization, politics, war, subterfuge, all SORTS of good stuff! I find it pretty well written as well. The plot flows quickly and keeps from getting too bogged down in any one particular part, jumping to different points of view frequently and skipping the boring minutae when needed.

Next up on the reading pile is Stephen King’s 11/22/63 that we’ll be covering on the next episode of “Dad and his Weird Friends”. I’ve heard nothing but praise for this book and it’s been awhile since I’ve gotten through one of King’s more recent books. Not to knock the guy; I like his books well enough. None of the recent ones have held my attention though. On this episode, I’m being joined by film maker and podcaster (and mistaken brother) Bryan Wolford of the Drunken Zombie podcast, so should be fun.

Finally, speaking of the “Dad and his Weird Friends” podcast, my latest episode is now up for your listening pleasure! With the release of Disney’s “John Carter”, I decided it was finally time I get around to reading “A Princess of Mars” and it turns out that I was quite pleased that I did. Tracey from the Disney Indiana Podcast stopped by and we had a good time geeking out on the adventures of John Carter and Dejah Thoris.

The crowning achievement for me this episode was having my own daughter join me on the show to discuss James Patterson’s “Daniel X: Watch the Skies”! She was a little nervous as can be expected; podcasting’s a big deal after all! I think she did great though. As you can tell by our discussion, she’s a bit of a chip of the old block as far as liking scifi and genre stuff in general, so it was pretty great to have her own. She’s already talking about coming back on again, so look forward to that!

If you haven’t grabbed it yet, Episode 9 of the Dad and his Weird Friends Podcast can be grabbed from the Bloody Good Horror Feed!

Until next time,

Buh bye.

Tuesday, March 13th, 2012 | Author: Casey Criswell

I just added this one to the list this morning after reading a review over at Bookgasm. With my recent obsession with “Justified” and hearing some of my favorite podcasts discussing sphagetti western’s here lately, the idea of reading some western’s has been piquing my curiosity. Seeing as I’ve not read many (any), I figure a western mixed with an urban fantasy might be a good jumping in point for me!


This one, I blame Mark for. Mark knows who he is. He’s been pretty adamant on Facebook that I need to give this one a read. Mark and I have a history; back in say…’94-95, we went to college together. Between classes, we’d take a smoke break and talk about books and such. Mark was adament then that I needed to read “Elric” which I finally gave in and did…last year. Yes, 16 years later. This book though, I’m all for military sci-fi epics, so it’s going to get read soon. (I promise Mark)


“Throne of the Crescent Moon” is getting some rave reviews by many of the book blogs here lately and the plot blurb DOES sound fun! It’s no secret that I’m a pretty huge fan of fat fantasy but I am woefully inexeperienced with anything with an “Arabian Nights” flavor to it. Ahmed’s use of this setting makes this book pretty tempting simply on the fact that it’s not sword & board or the typical dragons/orcs/trolls type monster fare. I’m pretty excited to get to this one, truth be told!


I stumbled across a description of “The Dig” in a book forum somewhere and it sounded interesting. I’ll be honest here though; It got added to the list for nefarious reasons. The main character and basic plot is vaguely similar to some of the ideas I’m playing with in my own misguided (and oh god so slow) attempt at a first novel. Frankly; I wanted to see what he did with the idea. I also want to make sure I don’t wind up inadvertantly ripping off any of his elements.


Jack McDevitt is a perennial entry on many ‘must read’ science fiction lists and…well…I haven’t read him before. With my recent attempts to go back and read some of the classics that I have missed in the past, I’ve seen “A Talent for War” mentioned as a must read many times. (It’s not classic in the ‘age’ sense, mind you) I’ve enjoyed a bit of future history before, so the plot seems like it’s right up my alley. Or in my wheelhouse as the corporate blow hards here at work would like to say.


This entry is nepotism at it’s finest! Well…not really. I’ve been a member of the Something Awful forums since late 2002; author Zack Parsons is one of the better known contributors and staff members there at Something Awful. Zack has had two non-fiction books I’ve enjoyed, “My Tank is Fight” and “Your Next Door Neighbor is a Dragon”. “Liminal States” is his first foray into straight up fiction, so I figure it’s worth a shot!


Good friend Derek hit me up a couple weeks back raving about “Nobody Gets the Girl”. Seeing once again as it was delving into the territory of my own writing project, (yes, the same one mentioned above) I figured why not see how the professionals write super hero fiction! Sure, I know super hero fiction in the comic book form. I can’t say I’ve actually read any in novel form. Derek is normally pretty spot on with his opions (except when he’s wrong about things such as The Vampire Lovers).


It’s been ages since I’ve read a trashy Star Wars novel. Honestly, it had been a bit since I was into much of anything Star Wars related. Following a recent bout playing Star Wars the Old Replublic, my rabid Star Wars curiosity piqued again. Darth Plagueis has had some decent word of mouth as far as dark side stories go, but now that I’m done playing SW:ToR, I don’t know how much longer this book will stay on the to-read list.


Yes…THAT “Solaris”. I was never brave enough to try and sit through either movie, but the plot of a planet sized alient entity sounds pretty intriguing. Again, this book is a product of my effort to read some older sci-fi novels and it comes pretty highly recommended. Who knows, maybe I WILL watch the movie!


I LOVE Sci-Fi. Yes, I love Sci-Fi even more than horror. I REALLY love colonization stories. Like…I get all giddy and become totally obsessed by stories of mankind clawing it’s way to the far corners of the universe to survive. “First contact was not supposed to be like this. The first intelligent species to encounter mankind attacked without warning and swarmed locust-like through the solar system. Merciless. Relentless. Unstoppable. With little hope of halting the savage invasion, Earth’s last, desperate roll of the dice was to send out three colony ships, seeds of Earth, to different parts of the galaxy. Earth may perish but the human race would live on… somewhere.” Oh yes. I NEEDS IT. (P, if you read this far, you know we gotta read this!)

Anybody else notice Orbit has been putting out some really great books?