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Friday, August 10th, 2012 | Author: Casey Criswell

We’re back once again over here at the Weird Friends podcast with a whole new episode! This time around, we go with some fairly light horror fare with Chuck Wendig’s “Double Dead”!

This book was a pleasant surprise for myself. I have a good friend that I’ve traded books back and forth with for years. Said friend, Ak, hit me up awhile back with an article on Chuck Wending stating that he had been hearing quite a bit of buzz on him and the plots of his existing books grabbed me fairly quick! I’ve read a lot of zombie novels here as of late and while I do enjoy them, they tend to get a bit too heavy and in some cases, a bit too repetitive. Wendig’s version of the undead apocalypse was a nice change of pace that moved quick and wasn’t too heavy with ennui, melancholy, and stoic rambling.

Wending has some other books that look really good too, Blackbirds and Mockingbird. Both of these have catapulted up to the top of my to-read pile after reading “Double Dead”, so should be cool!

As always, the Dad and his Weird Friends show can be found on Bloody Good Horror Feed and iTunes! Give us a listen, let us know what you think! Feedback is welcome and encouraged, send your missives to casey@bloodygoodhorror.com!

Finally, come join us in the Dad and his Weird Friends Book Club on Facebook! We like to talk about books and if that’s your thing, we’d love to have you with us. It’s been a bit slow here lately, but that’s because we don’t have you there to help spice things up!

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Monday, February 07th, 2011 | Author: Casey Criswell

(Note: This review was posted last night on my Good Reads profile! Need some friends on good reads? Feel free to add me!)

I tried to read this once many many years ago and got distracted. This time, I was able to dig in a little better. It’s a nice change up from your typical vampire book. There’s nothing really gothic about it at all and it’s a nice twist on the standard lore. Honestly, you don’t even get a lot of the stoicism or self loathing that is common in these types of stories. Instead, it’s a nice little bit of intriguing story telling.

The characters are great; Harry Keogh is a bit all powerful, but he’s written well, you can get behind him. Dragosani’s demise was well fitting. Some of the book was a little too out in left field making it hard to decipher what was going on in the world of the “Necroscope”, but these moments were few and far between. If I had to gripe about anything, I’d say some of side characters lacked any kind of emotional backing that made us feel for them despite the situation. They’re still interesting characters and fun to read.

The key to getting the most enjoyment out of this book is to remember; despite the cover picture, despite the plot blurbs, this isn’t your daddy’s Dracula. Or your sister’s Twilight for that matter. The vampires are a key element, but this is more a story of cold world espionage, or should I say ESPionage, with some super powers thrown in to boot. The book bogs down a slight bit in the middle; there’s a lot of internal monologue and not as much action as you would hope from a cold war spy agency/vampire story. teh end manages to ramp things back up and make for some good popcorn style action.

All in all, looking forward to the next book! There appears to be a metric buttload in the series as a whole. (something like 15 of them according to brianlumley.com) This first book is geared solely at the act of character building but gives a sense of being on the verge of something epic. I’d like to think that the 15 books listed as the Necroscope saga means this is an epic story indeed!